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CDC Reminders for COVID-19 and Flu Vaccines

As cold and flu-season gears up, the CDC has issued reminders to receive your COVID-19 and flu vaccinations.

COVID-19

It is recommended by the CDC to receive an up-to-date COVID-19 vaccine for anyone five and older. The CDC recognizes the Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, and Novavax vaccines for use in the United States. Though, it does not believe that neither one is better than the other two. Updated Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines were approved for use in the United States on September 12, 2023. An updated Novavax vaccine was approved on October 3, 2023. The updated vaccines are believed to be more effective against current variants of COVID-19.

The CDC urges you to stay up to date on your COVID-19 vaccine. It can protect yourself and your loved ones from the risk of severe illness, hospitalization, and dying from COVID-19. The CDC also advises waiting three months after testing positive for COVID-19 to receive your vaccine. You may need a booster in less time if there’s a risk of severe disease, close contacts, high hospital admissions, or new variants.

For more information on COVID-19 vaccines, please refer to the links below:

Flu

The CDC advises anyone six months or older to receive a flu vaccine once a year. Influenza vaccines play an important role in reducing the spread and fatality of the flu. Recommendations related to which vaccine is right for you and when to take should be made by a healthcare professional. The CDC also recommends the following should receive an influenza vaccine:

  • Essential workers – Healthcare personnel; Pharmacy staff; Critical infrastructure staff
  • Persons at increased risk of COVID-19 – 65+ adults; People with underlying health conditions
  • Persons at increased risk of flu complications – Infants 6 months to children under 5; Children with neurologic conditions; Pregnant people

The CDC does note certain side effects to flu vaccines that occur within 72 hours after vaccine injection. These include:

  • Local reactions – Redness, pain, and swelling at injection site
  • Systemic reactions – Fever, chills headaches, and body aches
For more information on influence vaccine resources, please visit:
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